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If you’re thinking about working in different parts of the world and want to know more about the locations we serve, here is some information for you.

Middle East | Abu Dhabi | Al Ahsa | Bahrain | Dammam | Dubai | Jeddah | Kuwait | Madinah | Oman | Qatar | Riyadh | Saudi Arabia | United Arab Emirates (UAE)

MIDDLE EAST

Benefits of working in the Middle East - Tax-free salaries and low outgoings

  • These are two of the biggest benefits of working in the Middle East. All salaries are tax-free at source and with free accommodation and utilities, it is possible to save a considerable amount of money.
  • Flights to and from the Middle East will be paid at the beginning and end of your contract and will usually include a mid-year round trip ticket, which most of our candidates use to visit their families.
  • Annual leave is generous with some hospitals offering up to seven calendar weeks and you’ll receive a bonus at the end of your contract.
  • Given the location, most holiday destinations in Africa, India, Asia, Australia and South East Asia are far closer than they would be from Europe.
  • Doctors and senior managers are usually offered family-status contracts and benefit from an education allowance for their dependent children.
  • Nurses and allied healthcare professionals will generally (with occasional exceptions) be offered single-status
  • contracts.

Accommodation

Most clients will provide you with air-conditioned, comfortable accommodation, either through allowances or at special ‘compounds’. These are private complexes, rather like gated communities, located within or near the hospital grounds.
Life within a compound is free of the restrictions of many Middle Eastern countries in terms of dress codes and alcohol restrictions, and free transport is provided to and from work and for local shopping.

Social life

Morgerty hospitals organise trips to interesting places and you will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of recreational activities. As you get to know your colleagues, your social life will take off and you probably won’t want to leave at the end of your contract.

 

ABU DHABI1

Abu Dhabi is the largest and most populated area of the seven emirates that makes up the United Arab Emirates; it is built on 87% of the country’s total land.

Abu Dhabi has a rich sense of ancient culture and heritage with a strong tradition of desert hospitality that lives on in the warmth and friendliness of the people here. Abu Dhabi is a safe and entertaining place for children of all ages; there are plenty of parks, sandy beaches, kid zones and crèche facilities in all major shopping malls.

 

 

AL AHSA2

With a history that stretches back around 2000 years, Al Ahsa is today home to shopping centres, a pottery works in the Jabal Al-Qarah cave and the King Abdullah Environmental Park with its dancing fountains, Heritage Village and amusement rides.The oasis region of Al Ahsa in eastern Saudi Arabia has the greenest scenery in the country. An abundance of fresh water springs along with continuous sunshine sustain the area's numerous palm trees and a thriving local agriculture.

While life in Al Ahsa and Saudi Arabia on the whole is famously restrictive.

 

 

BAHRAIN3

Officially the Kingdom of Bahrain,

The only island-state in the Arab world, Bahrain is a peninsula of 33 islands with a combined area about the size of Singapore. Its sunny climate and excellent diving and watersports mean the number of non-Arab visitors is increasing year on year.

The name Bahrain means "two seas" and it was once viewed as an island paradise where the wise and the brave were taken to enjoy eternal life.

In ancient times this was the location of the ancient civilisation of Dilmun, which prospered through dominating trade between Mesopotamia and the Indus Valley. Temples, ruins and burial mounds dot the landscape to this day and archaeologists are still working on excavations dating to 2500 BC.

Manama is modern and western, allowing alcohol to be sold and consumed and with fewer restrictions on dress than are found in other Middle Eastern countries.

However the rhythms of life in much of Bahrain remain
traditional. Women wear abayas and female visitors are expected to wear long skirts and avoid sleeveless or low cut tops and dresses.

Given that the accommodation is paid for, and that rates of pay are excellent, many expats choose to work in the Middle East for a period to save money and return home having done exactly that.

Being located in the area also means many holiday destinations in Africa, India, Australia and South East Asia are much closer than from Europe.

Arabic is the official language but English is widely spoken.

 

dam

DAMMAM

Dammam can be found in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern province. Once a cluster of fishing villages, with a history that stretches back more than 2,000 years, it has transformed into a modern commercial centre with a thriving oil industry and sea port.

While life in Dammam and Saudi Arabia on the whole is famously restrictive,Dammam is also a relatively short drive from Bahrain which has a more liberal lifestyle.

Dammam is also a relatively short drive from Bahrain which has a more liberal lifestyle.

 

 

dub

DUBAI


Once a small fishing village, Dubai has emerged as a truly global city and a business hub of the Gulf region. The second largest of the seven United Arab Emirates, it has the biggest population at over 2.1 million. The city is famed for its extravagant constructions, lavish shopping opportunities and high standard of living.

While Dubai tries to promote itself as the business and entertainment capital of the world, the government has a complex and at times frustrating work permit procedure that one should not attempt on their own unless they have prior experience. Therefore, it is best to go through official channels like Nursdoc.

All the necessary forms and documents are written and processed in Arabic and is best left to a professional or a "P.R.O" to handle your paperwork.

There are rules about changing jobs and its frequency. This rules are equally applicable for all nationalies. They have to complete their contract period, which is 2 years. If the employee breaks his/her contract before the completion of 2 years, the new employer has to offer them salary above 5000 AED in-order to avoid ban. Otherwise the employee has to wait until the completion of the left over months of his cancelled contract.If the employer breaks the contracts, then the employee can join another employer immediately irrespective of nationality , religion, cast or creed.

With the price of rentals ever soaring in Dubai and neighbouring Emirates, it’s Lucky that Nursdoc arrange housing allowance when we negotiating a pay package.

Despite all this, there are a few upsides, Our Dubai companies are generous with holidays averaging almost 39 days a year of paid vacation (including public holidays), a round trip ticket home once a year (depending on your contract) and most importantly all your earnings are 100% tax free.

Recruitment fraud is quite pervasive in this part of the world. Read your employment contract carefully before signing and do not pay any fees to recruitment agencies, as they are usually paid by the companies. Your passport is your personal property and cannot be withheld by the employer unless you are in a position of trust or are handling large sums of money.

Dubai has been accused by numerous organizations of effectively enslaving workers from Southeast Asia by allowing companies to take their passports without returning them and allowing salaries to go unpaid. Foreign workers, Western and otherwise, have no rights that will be upheld by the courts, and so they have no recourse should they feel their rights violated. Potential workers should be aware of this when considering work in Dubai.

More tolerant than much of the Middle East, Dubai allows non-Muslim visitors to enjoy alcohol and nightlife in its clubs and hotels.

 

JEDDAH5

Jeddah, popularly known as ‘The Ancestor of Women’, is the second largest city in Saudi Arabia after Riyadh. Due to its coastal location, the climate here is more clement than in other parts of Saudi Arabia.

Less conservative than Riyadh, it is nonetheless the principal gateway to Mecca, Islam's holiest city, which all able-bodied Muslims are required to visit at least once in their lifetime. Jeddah is also a gateway to Medina, the second holiest place in Islam.

This makes it an excellent location for Muslims looking to relocate from Europe.

 

 

KUWAIT6

Officially the State of Kuwait

Located on the north-western tip of the Arabian Gulf, oil-rich Kuwait boasts excellent shopping, as you might expect, and lots more besides.

Kuwait inhabitants enjoy water sports, boating, diving, snorkelling and family friendly beaches with shallow waters.

To escape the heat they head to the Olympic-sized ice-skating rink. It's home to the Kuwaiti Falcons (The the only Arab team to win membership of International Ice Hockey Federation).

Given that the accommodation is paid for, and that rates of pay are excellent, many expats choose to work in Kuwait for a period to save money and return home having done exactly that.

Being located in the Middle East also means many holiday destinations in Africa, India, Australia and South East Asia are much closer than from Europe.

The official language is Arabic but English is widely understood.

Although Kuwait is a traditional Muslim nation, western women are not required to wear abayas. However wearing shorts, tight-fitting clothes or revealing too much flesh is likely to attract unwanted attention. Men can dress as they please, but again wearing shorts or sleeveless vests is likely to be seen as disrespectful in some areas.

 

MADINAH7

Situated in the Hejaz region of western Saudi Arabia, Madinah is the second holiest city in Islam. With a population of around 600,000 people, Madinah is a Muslim only city, which means non Muslims won't be able to live or work here.

The long form of the Arabic name for Madinah (Madinat Rasul Allah) means "City of the Prophet of Allah." It was to Madinah city that Muhammad fled when he was initially driven out of Mecca, and it's the place where he attracted his first followers. Madinah currently has a population of about 600,000 people and is the home of "The Prophet's Mosque."

 

 

 

OMAN8

Officially the Sultanate of Oman

Oman is situated on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and shares borders with the United Arab Emirates, Yemen and Saudi Arabia, with the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman on its shores.

Nature lovers can go diving, dolphin-watching, hiking or off-road driving in the desert, while a trip across the border to Dubai is easily done by bus or car.

Oman's numerous expats make up almost a third of the total population, with overseas residents coming mainly from Britain, America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. Lifestyle here depends on where you live; Muscat is highly Westernised, with lots of malls, restaurants, bars, sports clubs and entertainment venues.

The Al Mirani and Al Jilali Forts in capital Muscat are some of the highest buildings in Oman. Other attractions include Mazirah Island, ideal for surfing and windsurfing, the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque, the Mutrrah Souk, the trading hub of Sohar, the traditional dhow building centre of Sur, the Rass Al Jinz Turtle sanctuary and the picturesque Telegraph Island

Being located in the Middle East also means many holiday destinations in Africa, India, Australia and South East Asia are much closer than from Europe.

The official language is Arabic but English is widely spoken.

The dress code in Oman is liberal, but women should wear tops with sleeves and long skirts or trousers. Men are required to wear long trousers and shirts with sleeves.

Given that the accommodation is paid for, and that rates of pay are excellent, many expats choose to work in Oman for a period to save money and return home having done exactly that.

 

QATAR9

Officially the State of Qatar

Qatar is the world's richest country per capita and in 2022 will be the first Arab country to host the World Cup.

More than half the population live in Doha, but beyond you'll find singing sand dunes, mangrove swamps and prehistoric carvings cut into hills.

The recent openings of the Museum of Islamic Art, Katara Cultural Village and Mathaf Arab Modern Art Museum helped Doha to be chosen in 2010 to be the Arab Capital of Culture by the Arab League under UNESCO’s Cultural Capitals Program.

The Pearl Qatar is group of thirteen, man made islands. It will be the Arabian Riviera. On these islands there will be luxury apartments, town homes, penthouses & villas, three marinas, five star hotels, schools & community facilities and two million square feet of international retail, restaurants, cafes & entertainment.

Alcohol consumption is partially legal here with some luxury hotels being allowed to sell alcohol to non-Muslim customers. Non-Muslim expats can also obtain a permit to purchase alcohol for personal consumption.

Given that the accommodation is paid for, and that rates of pay are excellent, many expats choose to work in Qatar for a period to save money and return home having done exactly that.

Being located in the Middle East also means many holiday destinations in Africa, India, Australia and South East Asia are much closer than from Europe.

The official language is Arabic but English is widely understood and always used by Pulse staff in their place of work.

In 2014, Qatar launched a modesty campaign to remind tourists of the modest dress code. Western female visitors and residents are advised to avoid leggings, miniskirts, sleeveless dresses, shorts or tight clothing in public. Men are advised against wearing shorts and sleeveless t-shirts.

 

RIYADH10

Expats in Riyadh will live in compounds, where the quality of life is good with pools, gyms, and various sports grounds frequently being standard features.

In compounds, dress codes don't apply, men and women can mix freely and you should get a decent internet connection or have access to a satellite dish.

Venturing beyond the compound, the National Museum, the Masmak Fortress, and the Kingdom Center with its spectacular skybridge are worth a visit.

Take a guided day trip through the spectacular Arabian Desert or do as the locals do - eat and shop.

Expat women should be careful to enter the 'family section' of shops and restaurants, however Kingdom Mall has a ladies’ floor where you can take off your abaya.

 

sau

SAUDI ARABIA


Officially known as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA)

Saudi Arabia is the largest country in the Middle East and is the birthplace and spiritual home of Islam.

It is also one of the most difficult places on earth to visit so a period working here grants rare access.

From the ancient, rock hewn archaeological site of Madain Saleh, to the world-class diving off the Red Sea coast, the mudbrick ruins of Dir'aiyah and the Asir Mountains of the southwest, this is a country of beauty and contrast. And then there is all that desert - most famously the Empty Quarter - an eery expanse of undulating dunes.

Jeddah, the Red Sea port is relatively cosmopolitan, as is capital Riyadh. Here elegant cafés and restaurants jostle with shops ranging from traditional souks to upmarket malls with the latest designer ranges.

Given that the accommodation is paid for, and that rates of pay are excellent, many expats choose to work in Saudi Arabia for a period to save money and return home having done exactly that.

Being located in the Middle East also means many holiday destinations in Africa, India, Australia and South East Asia are much closer than from Europe.
The official language is Arabic but English is widely understood.

Women should observe the strict Saudi dress code and wear conservative and loose-fitting clothes, including a full-length cloak (abaya) and a keep a scarf with them in case they are asked to cover their head by Muttawa. Men should not wear shorts in public or go without a shirt.

 

uae

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (UAE)


The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is the federation of seven emirates: Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Ajman, Umm Al-Quwain, Ras Al Khaimah, and Al Fujairah. Nearly 200 islands fall under the UAE territory, which stretches over 1448 km from the west coast of the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman to the Arabian Peninsula.

The UAE is rich in pearls, which sustained its population for centuries before the discovery of the plentiful oil which has fuelled a booming economy. Visitors today are attracted by perpetual sun, endless white sandy beaches and turquoise seas scattered with islands, coral reefs and ridges that provide excellent diving and snorkelling.

The UAE is mostly famed for its world class shopping but also boasts excellent restaurants and a burgeoning arts scene, with the Dubai Louvre scheduled to open in 2015.